"Real liberty is neither found in despotism or the extremes of democracy, but in moderate governments.
Alexander Hamilton

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Scenic Vistas

This is an add on to the previous post as there was also a discussion of scenic vistas last evening. I have heard many times about how important it is to maintain our rural character and uniqueness and we are in fact right now rewriting the Transportation and Land Use chapters of the Master Plan. The NH OEP ( Office of Energy and Planning) has an excellent article on ways to accomplish this. I am not advocating any taking of property rights or getting into the view tax debate, but thinking only of innovative ways to protect as much of our natural beauty as we can. Let me give one example: the wind towers in Groton. Hard to miss as you drive into Plymouth. A beautiful mountain ridge with very large structures all along the top and owned by a foreign company, Iberdrola.  Here is part of the NH OEP article:

"Residents of a community have thoughts and ideas about what makes their surroundings and community visually important and attractive. They generally enjoy views of open fields, farm settings, mountain vistas, water views and tree shaded streets, qualities that make people feel positive about their environment. The challenge is to preserve these visual attributes while working them into our future development. The following suggests a process for: 

  •  Identifying scenic areas in a community 
  • Providing a clear statement in the master plan about goals for preservation of scenic values, and
  • Incorporating specific policies into the zoning ordinance, subdivision regulations and site plan review regulations that will enhance the aesthetic qualities that define the community and make it unique."

11 comments:

First Things First said...

Incorporating specific policies into the zoning ordinance, subdivision regulations and site plan review regulations that will enhance the aesthetic qualities that define the community and make it unique."
They left out a big protection, an archetectural Rewiew board, to help keep new construction in keeping with its surroundings. This is one topic where we have our pants down big-time. Ride out 104, then 4 north to Endfield and see the new Family Dollar tin can ( metal building ) right on Main Street with small setback. Astounding that they could be that Insensative to surroundings...
It's coming here..unless we get on this. Call or write your local Director of Community Devo, and tell him " you need this, today "

Anonymous said...

Good idea, a project with merit.

Cut It Back said...

Identifying scenic areas in a community
Providing a clear statement in the master plan about goals for preservation of scenic values, and
This is a timely topic, and brings up mowing the roads, especially our state roads, for safety, sight lines and the senic improvement. Our state highway district seems to be worst in the state for cutting back the roadsides. A lot of it between Moultonboro Village and Greenes Corner looks like a third world nation. Difficult to look at millions of dollars for new projects, when we can not afford to maintain what we have.
This is what makes it such a joy to ride thru Sandwich, they groom the roadsides. Even Tamworthlooks mowed....what is the problem here?


Josh Bartlett said...

I could suggest that we go very carefully down the road of "Architectural Review Board"....
There are very few things more difficult to legislate fairly than taste.
Private property rights are basic to our freedoms, and although I acknowledge that some folks can have some ideas that I would consider in very poor taste, I don't think we want someone telling us what color to paint our houses.
I would think there are ways to encourage good design without getting into another bureaucratic boondoggle.
Sometime this effort to control other people's property can seem like pure snobbery.

Anonymous said...

Senic vista...NOT...start down the Neck Road...the landscaper on the right is using six of his trucks , parked at the road, to block off his lower entrance. What happened to the setback rule...It does not allow parking.
A couple of doors down on the left is a special exemption for snowmobile and jet ski repair, running a door yard sales lot for boats, R Vs and big toys, with 8 vehicles in the door-yard, and the next house with an early serayavo motif of fallen trees... Gateway toLong Island..NOT pretty

Mt. Rattler said...

Maybe we should just focus on incoming Commercial building rather than Residential buildings. At least we would have a say in their appearances, seeing that a lot of these chain retailers have an Architectual model for their buildings already in place..

Joe Cormier/jcormier2@myfairpoint.net said...

The following URL may be useful to inquisitive minds, that would like to peruse current, state activity (i.e., RSA's)regarding transportation.

http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/NHTOC/NHTOC-XX.htm


Anonymous said...

Mr. Rattler, in the last year 2 commercial buildings have been proposed in Moultonboro. As far as I know both are DOA. The town appears to be polarized on the issue. Any suggestions?

Mt. Rattler said...

To Anon: I am not against commercial business on entering our town, however the majority of us agree that chain store facades are not what we want here. I suggest putting Architectual restrictions, strictly in the village district. Thus keeping with the village atmosphere we are leaning towards. In regards to commercial zones along 25, I'm not suggesting pushing for changes of pre existing businesses, but for any new incoming buildings. We should adjust the master plan to have basic Architectual guidelines that a business needs to adhere to. I believe they should have wiggle room, to adjust their buildings look to fit their vision, but at least we the residents, can have basic guidelines in place, knowing what will be put up, will look somewhat New England in character. It's a fine line, I understand, but we have to draw a line to a degree if we are to make our pretty little "village" stay a step up from what we see plaguing the commercial zones, of the such as Tilton, Gilford etc.

Fair All Around.. said...

Suggestions : Mr Rattler will have some good ideas, but we need to look at the options the town has to make this Fair to all. Planning - zoning is the only key. The commercial property owners have rights, within limits, to sell to who ever they please. We can not flat out ban a type of use for a property, tho there are a few restrictions..school proximity being one, if we adopt it...
While we can not ban most uses, an archetectural Review Board would ease the problem for both sides. We can help potential commercial buildings be more in keeping with their surroundings. We can also protect other commercial property owners from having a detrimental design built next door, saving their investment. I believe this is the only avenue open to us, thru P - Z

Mt. Rattler said...

I concur.