Monday, October 26, 2015

Lakes Region Master Plan

The Lakes Region Planning Commission prepared and presented a five year Granite State Future/ Lakes Region Plan last March 2014 that was formerly adopted in November 2014. Within the plan is a lot of information that we can ( and should ) use for various planning purposes. As we focus on demographics of late, the Housing Chapter contains the following:
"For the next 25 years (2015 to 2040), the population projections call for the Lakes Region to grow very slowly in contrast to the past. The projections call for an increase to 123,940 persons in 2040 for a total increase of 10,968 or 9.7 percent over the 25-year period. That represents an
annual average increase of about 0.4 percent per year."





The population has shifted from younger people in the 20 to 44 age groups to older
people in the 45 to 69 age groups in 2010. The source of information is the American Community Survey and the 1990 and 2010 U.S. Census.
















           
This shift in population does not match the housing inventory: "New Hampshire’s current housing supply is poorly aligned with evolving preferences among different age groups. This mismatch exists both for aging Baby Boomers and younger workers. Older residents are likely to seek to “down-size” to smaller living arrangements, yet housing units of 3+ bedrooms far outnumber one- and two-bedroom units in the state."

Some other interesting facts:

  •  In 2012 Manufacturing accounted for 13.3 percent of total private employment in the region and accounted for 17.8 percent of wages earned in private industries. 
  • The two main sectors in the goods-producing domain are Manufacturing and Construction. Between 2005 and 2012, employment in both of these sectors has dropped by more than a quarter f their original base
  •  In 2012, one in five jobs in the Lakes Region was in Retail trade and close to one in five jobs was in Leisure and hospitality
  • Lack of employment opportunities during the winter months can create hardship for some residents.
  • Lack of  affordable housing- According to Occupational Employment Statistics May 2012 survey, the average wage for Retail salespersons and Waiters and waitresses in the Lakes Region were $11.88 and $11.15, respectively. In comparison, the average for All Occupation in the region was $19.36.
  • An increase in tourism spending translates into more employment opportunities in Accommodation and food services, Retail trade, Administrative and waste management services (such as janitorial and landscaping services) and other services (such as boat repair and maintenance).
  •  56 percent of the working residents commuted outside the LRPC area for work in 2011. - Conversely, a large portion of the region’s workers live outside the region. In 2011, about four out of ten job holders working in the Lakes Region commuted in from outside the region.
  • If there are no reasonable employment opportunities within a one-hour commute, families with children may not want to relocate to the region and young adults living in the region are more likely to migrate to other areas for better job opportunities. 
Despite all these changes, there is reason to be positive: " The aspects of life in the Lakes Region that attracts visitors and year-round residents remain – an attractive lifestyle, lakes, mountains, good internet service, proximity to urban centers. Regional development corporations are encouraging your entrepreneurs to move here and are developing training programs in advanced manufacturing."

Regionally and locally, we have been somewhat slow to respond to what we have known for quite awhile. What is important now, is how we respond to the ongoing changes and how we plan to address them.



6 comments:

Anonymous said...

I believe bullets 4,5 and 7 are related. It is expensive to live in the Lakes Region. According to the provided data, almost 40% of the jobs in the area pay $11 to $12 dollars an hour. Rents are very high and are unaffordable with those wages. So who can afford to live here? The answer is Boomer retirees from other areas and telecommuters to appease another recent poster. Those who think they can make the town have a diverse, vibrant citizenry will not like the answer but it is the real world. There are some working professionals and business owners (including trades) who can also afford the area, of course, although many of them commute outside the Lakes Region according to bullet 7.

Anonymous said...

Perhaps building housing that is affordable is a better solution and increasing the minimum wage to a livable level.

Anonymous said...

Who will pay for that. not the State as in other places? Extending the sewer line to the Village to make development of a neighborhood more feasible was in another thread. Has the town actually spoken to any developers of subdivisions (don't see many subdivisions around although there may be one at the Weirs) to see if there is any interest, expectation of selling prices, hurdles to be overcome, etc.?

Anonymous said...

Informative report by the LRPC. Clearly, our Selectmen, Town Administrator, Town Planner and Planning Board have their work cut out for them. Top on the list should be a viable plan coupled with a list of priorities. The town needs clear headed leadership, vision and steady hands able to navigate us through the next 25 years.

"An aging population brings an increase in demand for health care, personal care, and other services related to home maintenance." Since Moultonborough and the Lakes Region is undeniably graying what strategies does the town have in place to deal with an aging population? Personally I've not heard of any.

Testing for Nancy said...

Nancy test A

Joseph Cormier said...

"Regionally and locally, we have been somewhat slow to respond to what we have known for quite awhile. What is important now, is how we respond to the ongoing changes and how we plan to address them."

Wise words.

What does :
"In 2012 Manufacturing accounted for 13.3 percent of total private employment in the region and accounted for 17.8 percent of wages earned in private industries. "

...actually mean?

NH has never been a manufacturing mecca, in a national perspective, save the textile era. Manchester rode the coattails of Lowell, Mass. that became the textile capital of the world.See also the Waltham experiment.

Anybody remember the Mass. route 128 belt and high tech!

The percentages used in this paper, are data, not information, and possibly misleading.

I became a resident in 1996, although had a second home here since the late 70's (1970's not 1870's) and commuted to Concord for 17 years to my last work life job. The wife also worked in Concord and we saw the huge increase in southbound traffic on I-93. we would chuckle at the intersection of Rt. 25 and the Neck Rd. seeing cars in front of us, that we saw almost every day heading south on I-93, even after we were getting off in Concord. We also noticed the age bracket was close to, or the same as ours.

"Despite all these changes, there is reason to be positive: " The aspects of life in the Lakes Region that attracts visitors and year-round residents remain – an attractive lifestyle, lakes, mountains, good internet service, proximity to urban centers."

... AMEN!