Thursday, November 12, 2015

Two Presentations on Housing on BoS Agenda Tonight

As we continue to think about the future and our ability to keep and attract people of all age groups, another conversation will occur tonight. At one end of the spectrum is a presentation by the Laconia Area Community Land Trust for some perspective on affordable housing. An example of their projects is Harriman Hill in Wolfeboro. "Harriman Hill II consists of 24 permanently affordable apartments in six buildings. Rent up is underway. Co-developed with our partners Eastern Lakes Region Housing Coalition, Harriman Hill is a three-phase development located on a 35-acre site off Pine Hill Road (Rte.109A). Phases I and II include a mix of one–, two–and three-bedroom apartments. Phase III will offer single-family and duplex units available for sale to income-qualified buyers. "  
Planning Board Chair Scott Bartlett and Town Planner Bruce Woodruff will present Moultonboro's progress and ideas on housing  for  the Master Plan update. 
Both presentations will be about 15 minutes. 
I don't know what Moultonboro's solution will be in regards to housing for both younger families and older retirees , but I can envision it being our own unique answer. I have learned in my now three and one half  years of public office an six and one half years of blogging,   that our town for the most part does things its  own way and relatively slowly. We are unique and want to retain the things that make us unique, but at the same, we need to respond to the changes that are coming and are for the most part, out of our control. 
How to best do that is the key question. 
As we are faced with new businesses that want to come to our town that some do not want at all, or do not like the location proposed, we need to keep in mind that we have been practically begging for citizen participation the last few years as we develop a new Master Plan. I suspect that many citizens do not recognize the legal ramifications of zoning ordinances nor the roles of the Land Use boards in crafting them or enforcing them. We need also respect the rights of property owners to achieve full value for the properties they own and wish to develop. 
Getting involved in future planning is a lot more than starting and signing petitions. In some ways it is safe to say that the future is now, as decisions made on zoning this next year or two at  the ballot box, will have implications well into the future.  


7 comments:

Mt. Rattler said...

My Prayers go with the People of France this evening, and may we, as a People wake up, and start working together for a change.

Anon said...

Planning Board. This one slipped out by the planning board member at this meeting.
Fancy term of "oversight".
Apparently the Planning Board currently has "advisory" oversight of any architectural oversight of any new business construction in the town.
Now at this meeting the Planning Board member stated that the Planning Board wants "mandatory" oversight or any new business constructed in town. What does that mean?
It means that the Planning Board has the final say in the actual design of any new building in town. So here, with this, the Planning board can reject a new business application if the Planning Board does not like the architectural design. This is way too much power given to these few individuals in the Planning Board. A perpetual denial of any new business attempting to open shop in Moultonborough. Is this what the citizens of Moultonborough want? One way to stop any and all new businesses from constructing a new building in town.
All at this meeting were in agreement that the town of Moultonborough must grow. New businesses and new housing.
So now we are going to give the Planning Board more authority to block new businesses?
It is a shame that we still have authority people placing more roadblocks in front of new businesses attempting to locate in Moultonborough.

Moultonboro Blogger said...

I don't believe the intent is for town wide oversite, but mainly for the village area. The Village Vision survey respondents were highly in favor of enacted architectural standards in this area.

Joseph Cormier said...

Problem might be writing and enacting zoning ordinances with intent ... altruistic as they might be, to stave-off legal challenge.

Maybe some thought should be given to solicit some English majors, with an inclination to legalese, as interns.

We may have too many experts, rather than interns, on town committees/Boards majoring in MoBo culture.

Anonymous said...

Architectural issues aside, building in wetlands is wrong. Anyone has the right to own swampland, but the rights to drain it don't come with the deed. Where does wetland oversight come from if not the planning and zoning boards?

Anonymous said...

Building in wetlands maybe wrong but much of the land in town is wetlands. Why is it some get a building permit and others don't?

Joseph Cormier said...

Wetlands ... ????????

Is this topic from the meeting?

Is this about Josh's comment regarding the property for sale in the west part of MoBo (22 acres or so)? The ... "some wetland" ... comment was incidental ... you know ... like incidental to "DEPENDS":

https://www.google.com/search?q=depends+diapers&biw=1252&bih=523&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0CEgQsARqFQoTCInVnp6ik8kCFcT3Hgod6y4IRw

The issue was about zoning, and why doesn't it reflect the town needs.

Zoning ordinances are the instrument that are suppose to reflect the master plan. The master plan is a guidance mechanism, that is suppose to reflect the town's vision/land wishes, as approved by the town legislative body. All must follow NH law and Federal law.

If the ordinances don't reflect town need ... then change them! Here's a clue ... master plans can change, as well.

Some wetlands law:

https://www.nhmunicipal.org/TownAndCity/Article/239

http://des.nh.gov/organization/divisions/water/wetlands/categories/rules.htm

http://des.nh.gov/organization/divisions/water/wetlands/

http://www.envcap.org/statetools/swift/swift2.cfm?st=NH