Monday, January 18, 2016

Demographics

At last Thursday's BoS meeting, it was stated from the audience that 74% of Moultonboro's population are retired. I thought that number was far too high so I did some fact checking. According to NH Employment Security , Moultonboro's median age in 2013 was 54.6 and there were 1,050 residents over the age of 65, about 26%. Not all are retired and there are probably a fair amount under the age of 65 that may be retired, but no where near 74%.  I would call the 74% retiree figure to be incorrect.

2 comments:

Mellisa Seamans said...

Conversations about Carroll County's aging population always remind me of a book I keep on my desk - Communities and Consequences (The Unbalancing of New Hampshire's Human Ecology and What We Can Do About It) by Peter Francese and Lorraine Stuart Merrill.

The median age in the USA is 37.8 years. New Hampshire 41.1, and Carroll County 49.7 years, giving our county the dubious distinction of being the being the oldest county in the state.

I try to keep a passage from the book in mind when involved in planning/zoning/economic development conversations in my community and especially when I vote - "...making communities more welcoming to young families may may ultimately come down to a fundamental attitude shift such that children are once again viewed as a vital community resource, and not just an intolerable financial burden"

Joseph Cormier said...

Melisa makes some good points.

A review of the book also comments:

"One issue the authors highlight, and substantiate with hard statistics, is how concerns about increases in school costs often motivate individual towns to restrict growth. Using legislation at the town level, local officials aim to control the growth of residential housing, rising school costs and, hopefully, sprawl. Yet in actuality sprawl is increasing, school enrollments are dropping all over New England and New Hampshire is becoming a state losing its social capital as younger workers and families have to face longer commutes. "


No only school costs, but school enrollment, as well ... but for the opposite reason. Increase school enrollment by spending more, for questionable efforts.

http://www.perpublisher.com/per114.html



Some MoBo stats can be found at:

http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml

type zip code 03254